Outdoor protection.

Thursday, 12 March 2009


”Wearing it like you stole it” should be the motto written on plaques and glued to the wardrobes of sartorialist men. It’s time to stop saving clothes for so called special days, everyday you wake up alive and pour one table spoon of sugar into a bowl of cornflakes is a special day. Residing in world capitals of consumption like London, Paris, Tokyo and NY, open gates to limitless imaginations for daily wear. Small cities tend of be confined bubbles of homogenous fashion replicated by thousands of people, who’s local shopping mall offer Boss Orange and their most exclusive range of clothing. In London shyness on the same level as Pinocchio is quickly transformed into obscene level of confidence that drive women to wear skirts that are so low that escalator rides on the underground can be an arousing experience for men.

It’s a beautiful thing to see hot ashes carried by the wind from an irresponsible smoker’s cigarette, burn through your own clothes. There is not a more honourable way for clothes to die than during combat with outdoor forces. That’s after all the purpose of clothes right, to serve and protect? But what if death could have been postponed and a precious cardigan made out of Italian wool didn’t have to sustain permanent stains caused by the bearer restring his arms on sticky tables at Starbucks? Sometimes we need to think beyond what our clothes can do for us and consider what we can do for our clothes. Ryanair aircrafts are major hazards and if you’re wearing anything more precious than a sweatshirt from GAP then you should refrain from sitting next to the alley way. With Ryanair contemplating charging £1 for toilets, their services are becoming more alike travel on a cattle truck in Kazakhstan. Onboard their aircrafts fighting over the arms rests will be your least concern as you will be dodging objects in order to protect your clothes from damage like potential alkaline streaks created by stewards pushing food trolleys through the very narrow alley scraping your shoulder in the process. Simple measures like wearing a coat can protect any fine wear from unnecessary damage, especially when Ryanair most certainly wouldn’t reimburse you if your cashmere cardigan fell victim of a chain suspended on the hip of an androgynist Goth guy.

Any man reading this post in a country with distinct seasons, have faced the complication of wearing a jacket over a blazer. The three most common outcomes are 1) You feel stuffed as a Turkey, 2) The blazer gets wrinkled, 3) You look like a fool. Sherlock Holmes is a man of admirable sense who shields his suit from stains by wearing a coat. Cotton is the best choice of material, especially without any padding since it allows for all year around versatility. Such a piece allow you to sit on park benches, lean on stripper poles and other spots where suit should not get in contact with. In simple terms it gives you the peace of mind of not having to baby sit your suit in fear of smudging it down with kebab dressing. Of course not everybody need protection, hedge fund managers driven around in racing green Bentley Arnage feel safe and relaxed resting against beige leather from cows breed in Sweden.

14 comments:

Anonymous said...

i love the pictures, and you have osme great ideas!

alizemorand said...

I definitely agree with the statement that everyday is a special day when one should dress up.

Wearing a beautiful dress can brighten my mood and my day - despite the grim London weather - and make me feel more confident and smiling.

Although I am a girl, I echo the issue of the blazer/jacket, so I end up choosing and resorting to cardigans under jacket/trench. But I have hope that Spring will arrive at some point ;) and I'll wear my chic blazers!

Alizé x

iluwfashion said...

Anonymous: Thanks

Alize: Pretty clothes sure make you feel better on a typical London day with a grey sky.

jollen said...

what brand is that first picture by?

iluwfashion said...

Jollen: Dolce & Gabbana

Grant said...

I do love how you write; so clever and beautifully worded and yet succinct as well. Reading your blog is a real treat.

I had a very harrowing experience with a beautiful cotton dress shirt and a poorly cleaned cafe table - the white cuffs were ruined by what I can only assume was some sort of sauce or jus - it has sadly, never recoved.

Xx

iluwfashion said...

Grant:Yeah, tables at many cafes and restaurants are not wiped clean thoroughly, leaving white cuffs in great danger.

Thanks for comment and keep reading!

Jake said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Jake Money said...

I am a complete advocate of a good coat, one that is stylish, protects from the elements and protects the clothes underneath.

rk said...

I love this blog, but can't help but notice that the writing style has changed recently. Do you have an extra staff member onboard?

iluwfashion said...

rk: There is no other person contributing to the blog but me. Could you possibly elaborate your comment a bit more.

Thanks!

rk said...

I've found that the writing style just seems different, is all. Perhaps it's just maturing over the course this blog has run? Development of the trade and all that.

Despite how rude it may sound I've also noticed what seem to be more grammatical/spelling errors than before, which could also have contributed to this...

iluwfashion said...

Thanks for the feedback. As far as the grammatical errors I apologize for them. Lately I've been incredibly busy with limited time for thorough proof reading, as of result posts are in most instances written in a rush very late at night.

Will take more care in the coming weeks.