Summer: Sun, sweat and short skirts.

Thursday, 4 June 2009


The summer has finally arrived but has temporarily retracted it’s presence from London. Substituting the sweltering heat that drew bikini wearing women to parks for binge tanning, grey skies hovering over the city and chilly winds now makes us leave home with an extra layer of clothing. But one bag item that is certainly not missed is a mandatory 500ml water bottle for topping up the body’s water supply when the heat becomes unbearable.

Summer is a bewildering concept. Without winter it wouldn’t exist the same way glory would be indescribable to someone who have never experienced the opposite – tragedy and tribulation. It’s perplexing how the common man on the street perceive summer as a destination, and keep him running on the treadmill of life in anticipation of reaching the pinnacle summer month of June. And the reasons for dreaming of June are many; parks and gardens are painted in vivid coloured plants, the gloomy mood of winter is washes away with warm ocean waves, days are longer and skirts worn by women are shorter and sexier. Life and joy peaks with few or no threats in sights that can disturb the elevated mood on as one enjoys the rollercoaster ride of sunshine, social gatherings and casual glasses of cider. City workers on the other hand, might think otherwise.

The underground - Eight in the morning - Six in the evening - Crowds of people. No more words need to be spoken for a wave of goose bumps to ripple across London. Swine flu is one of the few organisms that would thrive in the atrociously warm and humid conditions on the London underground. Forget carrying tanning oil. Anti-bacterial gel should be a part of your summer survival kit as close to every handle and pole is sticky or mysteriously greasy. Whoever argues that an automobile is an unnecessary commodity should rethink their viewpoint. Sweating is undeniably the prevalent agony of summer – in particular having to wash clothes after each use.

A straight forward solution to the near unavoidable reality of body perspiration is by keeping the surrounding air cool, and off course the wonderful invention of air-condition is what comes to mind. Most sweating occurs in transit when we rush out in the morning chasing time and when changing from one train to the next. The stress and time pressure makes the heart beat harder, faster and stronger keeping muscles up to task in providing maximum performance. And before you know it, the energising pulse is followed by uncomfortable body temperature that eventually leads to a damp shirt. The grandiose choice of having a chauffeur driven car is a near faultless solution to the problem. Relieving yourself from the worries of monitoring the gas meter, stress of finding a parking spot or beating the next yellow lights, you can comfortably and relaxed sit in the for enjoyable reading of the excellent European edition of the Wall Street Journal. Having time to read the morning papers is a luxury that cannot be indulged by those driving themselves to work.


Women live less sweaty and filthy summer life than men. A female worker with a keen interest in fashion is bound to have an inventory of summer specific clothes. Dressing down is an easy task of simply wearing a light dress, a short skirt or a sleeve less top with a moderate but appetising cleavage. Men are generally dared to challenge their boss’ tempter by shoving up to work in shorts exposing hair legs. The sight would be met with a laughter followed by a grim face signalling an unofficial warning – and possibly a dented relationship. Shorts and other casual summer items such as t-shirt are rarely well received in a corporate environment and are neither suitable to wear at work places where negotiations take place. Changing into more comfortable attire can lead to a compromised stature in a workplace. Luckily for women they don’t suffer the same character loss as they always successes in adapting to warm weather conditions without any of their glamour or visual power diminishing. Creative industries are safe havens for fashion as people’s minds and lifestyles are more liberal and adamant to on nurturing people’s artistic talent by awarding them with more freedom in their choice of clothing. If only more industries adopted the same culture then perhaps summer would become best and dreamy season we’re portraying it to be.

6 comments:

Bhuvan Chand said...

great article.......................

iluwfashion said...

Thanks and I ope you enjoyed it.

ediretnati said...

I think man can be fashionable too. isn't that right?

chromega said...

Almost vomited in my mouth as I thought the first few pics on your post was of that nasty Vincent Gallo. I'm glad that it's not and is, instead, pics of Tony Ward (if I'm not mistaken). Anyways, my only beef with summer is that whenever I wear a suit to work, I begin to sweat profusely. It turns me off so much that I've stopped wearing suits in the hot weather unless really necessary.

Fredrik said...

I must agree with you here.

iluwfashion said...

ediretnati: Sure a man can retain his swagger after a dress down but it's more challenging for men than for women.

chormega: Yes indeed it's Tony Ward in the photos. Speaking of suits I'll have to wear one tomorrow but the weather has blessed me with dark clouds, so it will be relatively chill for a June day tomorrow.